The Great Impeachment

To anyone who is paying the least bit of attention to what is going on in our country there is one item that is dominating the headlines: the impeachment trial of the President. However it turns out, at least half of the country (approximately) will be self-righteously angry and the other half smugly delighted.

In the grand scheme of history it probably doesn’t amount to much – perhaps a tiny blimp on the radar screen. So why all the fuss? Given that everyone in Washington knew that with the present makeup of the Senate they were unlikely to find him guilty, the real goal seemed to be to simply embarrass the President. Do whatever damage you can.

While I’m not a fan of this president, I can’t help but feel a little bit sorry for him. How would you like to be in his place?

Sure, he may deserve it, but don’t we all?

I’m reminded of the time a woman who had been caught in adultery was dragged before Jesus by a mob of men (John 8:1-11). I find two things especially interesting about this story. First, the man involved didn’t receive the same treatment. After all it takes two to tango (you get the idea), but only the woman is accused. Secondly, it wasn’t really about the woman, it was about Jesus. They were trying to find something that they could use against him, something to discredit him in the eyes of the populous with whom he had become wildly popular (see verse 6). She was simply collateral damage. They used her to get to him.

There’s no question that she was guilty. She didn’t claim otherwise, nor did Jesus say You’ve got the wrong woman. No, they had an adulteress all right. Guilty as charged. Punishable by death according to the Jewish law.

In one of the greatest turn-the-tables-on-them that you’ll ever find, Jesus told them to go ahead and carry out the punishment, but with one caveat, the first rock had to be thrown by someone who was sinless.

Boy, did he know how to break up a crowd! One by one they left with visions of their own sin flashing in their minds.

What about us? What do you think life would be like if we followed that piece of advice?

Go ahead, impeach him, but let the first witness be the one who has never sinned. The one who has no skeletons in his/her closet. That would make for a short trial.

But forget the Washington bubble. You and I live in the real world.

What would our lives be like if we lived by that standard?

Go ahead and get angry at him/her. Go ahead and speak ill of your neighbor. Go ahead and blame your co-worker. Go ahead and yell at your kids. But first just make sure that there’s no sin in your life.

Impossible standard? Sure it is. But then why do any of us think that we have the right to put someone else on trial when we should be standing in front of the mob with them?

He who is without sin among you, let him throw a stone at her first.

Stay in the Word

Pastor Steve

 

 

Live in the Spotlight

All of the talk out of Washington, D.C. seems to be about impeachment hearings. Regardless of the side you are on, it’s a serious time in our country. It must be hard to live under the ever-present eye of the public.

I can think of a lot of things that I would rather go through than to have my every word and action scrutinized in the public venue. Not too many people could survive that kind of examination unscathed. I wonder if any of our congresspeople who are investigating the president could go through such an ordeal and come out untouched at the other end. I somehow doubt it.

I know I couldn’t, and I suspect that there are few, if any, who could.

But as Christians, that’s where we live.

Consider two passages:

1 Peter 2:12

Having your conduct honorable among the Gentiles, that when they speak against you as evildoers, they may, by your good works which they observe, glorify God in the day of visitation.

Titus 2:7-8

In all things showing yourself to be a pattern of good works; in doctrine showing integrity, reverence, incorruptibility, sound speech that cannot be condemned, that one who is an opponent may be ashamed, having nothing evil to say of you.

We are to live in such a way that no one can legitimately say anything evil about us.  Our goodness (godliness) is to be so evident that when people look at our lives, what they see is so overwhelmingly good that even if they want to condemn us it will be difficult for them to find something to say.

Combined with Matthew 5:14 (you are the light of the world), the implication is that rather than shun the spotlight, we are to put ourselves in the spotlight so that people can see Jesus. We are to embrace the spotlight.

Politicians may not come out smelling so good when their lives are examined, but we should.

If the president, or any other public official is held to a high standard, we are to hold ourselves to an even higher one.

Our standard is not a constitution or law or ethical guideline. Our standard is the gospel of Jesus Christ (Philippians 1:26) and we are to live in such a way that we adorn the doctrine of God our savior in all things (Titus 2:10).

An interesting question might be: If my spiritual life was examined would I be impeached?

Stay in the Word

Pastor Steve